Potential East Coast Storm Could Follow Early Week System Moving Through Southern Tier of U.S.

weather.com meteorologists
Published: January 28, 2020

A weather system will move through the southern tier of the United States with rain and snow into midweek before attention turns to a potential storm system off the East Coast over the weekend.

Early Week System

A low-pressure system will slide from the Southern Plains on Monday night into parts of the Southeast by Wednesday. Light to locally moderate precipitation is expected, as this system will be fairly weak and moisture will be limited.

Showers and possibly a few rumbles of thunder will spread from eastern and central Texas and Oklahoma to the lower Mississippi Valley into Tuesday night. The rain shower activity will move into parts of the Southeast on Wednesday.

Some snow, or rain changing to snow, will fall on the northern fringe of this system from the northern Texas Panhandle into Kansas, Nebraska, northern Oklahoma, southern and central Missouri, northern Arkansas and the lower Ohio Valley.

Most accumulations will be light, but some heavier totals of up to 6 inches are possible in southern Kansas and northwestern Oklahoma.


Rain and Snow Forecast Through Wednesday

Potential Storm Off The East Coast This Weekend?

By late in the week ahead, there are signs that the upper-level pattern may change.

(MORE: Here's the Reason Much of the South and East Have Been Robbed of Snow This Winter

The jet stream is expected to take a southward dip over the East, which is a notable change from the recent pattern across the U.S. However, exactly when and where this occurs is uncertain.

As the jet stream shifts, another low-pressure system will develop and track across parts of the Gulf of Mexico and the South, where it could bring rainfall on Friday and Friday night.

This weekend, the system will then move into the western Atlantic Ocean, where its future track is uncertain.

Little or no impacts can be expected along the East Coast if the low-pressure system tracks farther offshore. Conversely, a track of the low closer to the coast would increase the chance of impacts from rain, snow or wind.

It's not unusual to have high uncertainty in the forecast when tracking a potential East Coast storm several days in advance. Be sure to check back to weather.com over the days ahead for updates.


The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.


The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.